Morgan library dining room

Published at Sunday, 13 December 2020.

SMALL PHOTOS - ON A TABLE OR SHELVES, BUT NOT A WALL. Many miniature photos or other images decorating the wall are perceived as visual noise. But on the table or shelves they look appropriate. It is advisable to arrange such decor in similar or identical frames. ATTENTION TO SCALE. A moment that at first glance seems obvious, but is not always respected - the proportionality of details to the interior as a whole. So, a huge picture in a small bedroom will look like an alien element, like a miniature sofa in a spacious living room. TIME MANAGEMENT IS NECESSARY IN THE CREATIVE PROCESS. After the choice of finishing materials is made, immediately proceed to their purchase or order. Refuse to be overly optimistic about delivery times. It is much more reasonable to assume that various delays and delays of suppliers are the norm, and not an exception to the rule. This principle will save a lot of time and energy. But do not forget to find a place in advance to store all the ordered materials and things.

Today the library is a complex of buildings which serve as a museum and scholarly research center. The scope of the collection was shaped in its early years as a private collection by Belle da Costa Greene, J. P. Morgan’s personal librarian, who became the library’s first director and served from the time that it became public until her retirement in 1948. Her successor Frederick Baldwin Adams, Jr. managed the Library until 1969 and was also world-renowned for his own personal collections. The most internationally significant part of the collection is its relatively small but very select collection of illuminated manuscripts, and medieval artworks such as the Stavelot Triptych and the metalwork covers of the Lindau Gospels. Among the more famous manuscripts are the Morgan Bible, Morgan Beatus, Hours of Catherine of Cleves, Farnese Hours, Morgan Black Hours, and Codex Glazier. The manuscript collection also includes authors’ original manuscripts, including some by Sir Walter Scott and Honoré de Balzac, as well as the scraps of paper on which Bob Dylan jotted down “Blowin’ in the Wind” and “It Ain’t Me Babe”.

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